It felt like sibling rivalry had overtaken our household and my sanity. In enacting three very simple sibling rivalry solutions, peace has been restored. Parenting from the Heart Positive Parenting

How to Stop Sibling Rivalry Using Unbelievably Simple Strategies

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It felt like sibling rivalry had overtaken our household and my sanity. In enacting three very simple sibling rivalry solutions, peace has been restored and our family is so much happier.


 

Sibling rivalry eroded the joy of parenting my kids. I still loved them and I still had fun with them. But before the going got tough, life was different. When I drifted off each night, I would excitedly think of what we would do the next day. In the morning, I would happily wake to see their big sparkling eyes, antsy to seize the day with them.

 

As their fighting became all-consuming, that started to change… Making coloured cloud dough or driving to the kids’ museum inevitably turned into a saga of poking, complaining, and hurling the occasional shoe at one another. I was less their mother and more a referee. No matter what reasoning or approach I tried, I was getting nowhere.

 

They screamed words of frustration.

“I said, ‘Leave me alone!'”

“I was here first!”

They hit, kicked and pinched one another. There were tears. So many tears.

 

My tension mounted. Each word of discipline I said was through gritted teeth.

“Hands to self, please.”

“Get away from each other.”

“Don’t you dare put her Shopkins in the garbage!”

 

Until my husband came home at night, it felt as though variations of those phrases were all I said. Discouraged and utterly frustrated, I went into survival mode. In an almost robotic fashion, I would separate them, voice a version of one of the phrases above, and do my best not to go absolutely stark raving mad.

 

Related resource: Download a cheat sheet to help you stay calm in the heat of the moment.

 

I resigned myself to the belief that, because my kids are only about a year apart, their sibling rivalry was inevitable.

 

The sibling rivalry solutions we weren’t ready for.

One night, I posted in a Facebook parenting group. The post was written completely in vain. In all honesty, I was hoping people would see the post and commiserate with me. I had hoped other parents would see my post and just simply say, “It’s brutal for us too.” Instead, there were several insightful tips.

 

My two favourites were:

  • “I tell them to work it out amongst themselves. And most of the time, it works!”
  • “Instead of telling them they have to apologize, I ask the kids how they can make it better.”

The only problem was my children were fighting more like dogs trying to assert dominance than two children in a heated disagreement. So I couldn’t enact these strategies yet.

 

It felt like sibling rivalry had overtaken our household and my sanity. In enacting three very simple sibling rivalry solutions, peace has been restored. Parenting from the heart
Often my kids fighting was reminiscent of puppies trying to assert dominance.

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The first big shift.

This summer, I came across a couple of viral Facebook posts about how kids shouldn’t have to share their toys.

 

When I reflected on my own family, I realized that the bulk of my kids’ grievances with one another came down to feeling territorial. Whether they fought over an area of the family room or who got the red hockey stick, they want to lay their respective claim to everything. The problem with the Facebook posts is the advocated approach failed to consider items that don’t belong to just one child. For instance, in the context of our home, the sidewalk chalk paint or the Wheels on the Bus board belong to both my older kids.

 

Then it dawned on me.

I decided to stop trying to sort out who had the singing Maui doll first, or how much time my son could use the doll before my daughter could have her turn. Instead, I told my daughter to ask, “Can I have Maui when you’re done?” My son responded, yes.  She was able to voice what she wanted and was acknowledged. He felt respected – the doll was staying with him until he’d had enough.

 

Suddenly, my two scwablers had (almost) nothing to argue over. What I love about this strategy (aside from the fact that it works!) is that it also translates well into the grown-up world. Hypothetically speaking, if I want to use the phone and my husband is on it, I wouldn’t say, “Give me the phone right now,” or “I’ve set the timer for five minutes.” I would ask to use the phone when he’s done.

 

Finally, the fierce and unrelenting desire to possess everything the other had had largely stopped. But… that didn’t mean my kids had stopped fighting entirely.

 

Related reading: Here are Effective Strategies to Get Your Kids to Listen

 

The other missing piece.

Fighting over resources was only part of the sibling rivalry issue. When my son decided to push his sister’s buttons or my daughter attempted to dictate what my son should do, their fighting could still snowball.

 

The biggest change came when I picked up the book, How to Talk so Kids Will Listen: How to Listen so Kids Will Talk. Just reading the first portion has been a game changer. The strategy the book starts with is incredibly simple. The authors advise readers to really listen to their children. That’s it.

 

When applied to sibling rivalry, it looks like this:

  • I ask the child who is the most upset to tell me what’s going on.
  • If the other child tries to interrupt I say, “I want to hear what you have to say, but I’m listening to your sister first.”
  • As the child gets everything off of her chest, I maintain eye contact, mirror back what she’s saying and nod.
  • Then if the other child still wants to speak, I do the same with him.

Surprisingly, they haven’t needed coaching after that, they get back to playing or they go their separate ways. It’s been incredible.

 

Related resource: Stop Sibling Rivalry from Snowballing Printable

It felt like sibling rivalry had overtaken our household and my sanity. In enacting three very simple sibling rivalry solutions, peace has been restored. Parenting from the Heart positive parenting
Sneaking in one-on-one time has done wonders for us.

The cherry whipped cream on top.

To improve all of the relationships, my husband and I have been prioritizing one-on-one time with each of our kids. My husband will take one kid. I will take the other. Often it’s been to do something impromptu like going to the grocery store. After getting what we need, we meander through the toy aisle. Or we sit at Starbucks and slowly sip kids’ drinks with extra, extra whipped cream. When our children feel connected and included, they are more willing to cooperate and listen.

 

Now that my kids felt respected, listened to and connected with, peace has been restored. Since enacting these three strategies, our whole family is happier and less tense. And I can finally use the strategies mentioned in that Facebook group. The change has been incredible.

 

It felt like sibling rivalry had overtaken our household and my sanity. In enacting three very simple sibling rivalry solutions, peace has been restored. Parenting from the Heart positive parenting. #positiveparenting #parentingtips #siblingrivalry #parentingfromtheheart #kidsfighting #parenting




2 thoughts on “How to Stop Sibling Rivalry Using Unbelievably Simple Strategies

  1. Thank-you so much for the tips! My kids, a year and a half apart, fight all the time! It drives me absolutely nuts! It feels like no one else’s kids fight as much. Like you, I’m excited about our days together, but end up completely frustrated breaking up constant fights. The fighting takes a toll on me, and can make me grumpy by the end of are what are supposed to be fun days. I wish I had one on one time with them, but being a single mom I don’t have the option. It is just nice to hear other moms feeling the same. Thank-you again for the tips! I’m going to try them out!!!

  2. Help! My kids feel they have to ‘one up’ each other. They talk over each other and are jealous instead of happy when another child succeeds by getting a better grade or award. Some times it does end with them getting physical with each other which breaks my heart. Any suggestions on how to encourage them to be their siblings cheerleader?

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